Brooks Haxton has published one book of nonfiction, six collections of poems, two book-length narrative poems, and three books of translations, His work has appeared in  The Atlantic, The New Yorker, The New York Times,   and in many journals. He wrote the script for   Tennessee Williams: Orpheus of the American Stage  , a film nationally broadcast in the American Masters Series on PBS.    In 2013 he received the Hanes Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers recognizing his body of work. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and others, he teaches in the Syracuse University M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing, and in the low-residency M.F.A. Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.    He lives in Syracuse with his wife and children.

 

Brooks Haxton has published one book of nonfiction, six collections of poems, two book-length narrative poems, and three books of translations, His work has appeared in The Atlantic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, and in many journals. He wrote the script for Tennessee Williams: Orpheus of the American Stage, a film nationally broadcast in the American Masters Series on PBS.  In 2013 he received the Hanes Award from the Fellowship of Southern Writers recognizing his body of work. A recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, and others, he teaches in the Syracuse University M.F.A. Program in Creative Writing, and in the low-residency M.F.A. Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.  He lives in Syracuse with his wife and children.

Author's Bio

Son of a Maori priestess and a Tasmanian pirate,
Brooks Haxton at two was thrown as a human sacrifice
from the gunwale of a careening brig into a typhoon.
Becalmed for forty days, the ship, with all his kin
on board, burst into sudden flame when struck
by an exploding meteorite. The poet, raised
by porpoises and marsupial wolves, grew to serve
as a young man at Gallipoli, where in a detachment
taking ninety-nine percent casualties he discovered the sestina
with its repeated end-words was especially suited
to his small vocabulary. For his Sestinas Under Fire

Haxton was awarded the Prix de Rome, the Croix de Guerre,
and Nobel Prizes in Literature, Physics, Medicine,
and several of the lesser categories. After brief stints
dancing for Diaghilev in Paris and acting under Stanislavski
in Moscow, he was sought out as a blues musician
by Charley Patton. Sick with fame and riches, he chose
anonymity as author of many of the great blues lyrics.
He was last seen over the Yazoo River east of Itta Bena,
borne in a silken hammock aloft by thousands
of ivory-billed woodpeckers. His poems now surface
through the mail with indecipherable postmarks,
in their folds fresh moultings of young ivory bills,
saffron dust, and legs of golden grasshoppers and bees.